Reaching the Unchurched…

Thom Rainer in a guest article for the Christian Post writes about our failure to reach the “unchurched.”

For now, let us focus on what is wrong. Let us look with stark honesty and candor at the ineffectiveness of most American believers when it comes to sharing their faith. And let us look at reversing the trend through God’s power.

1. Spiritual Lethargy – One of the main reasons many Christians do not share their faith is simply explained by the word disobedience. Spiritual lethargy takes place when we fail to obey Him. The problem for many Christians is that they are not growing spiritually, and lack of spiritual growth inevitably leads to a diminished desire to share Christ with others.

2. Growing Inclusivism – One of the faster-growing belief systems today is pluralism (all religions lead to God). A variation of pluralism called inclusivism is a dangerous doctrine that is gaining momentum in many American seminaries, Christian colleges, and churches. This view affirms that Jesus is the only way of salvation, but he can be found in other “good” religions. There is a subtle but growing belief among many Christians that somehow “good” followers will make it to heaven outside of a true Christian conversion. Our message will fall on deaf ears if this belief persists and grows.

3. Growing Disbelief in Hell – At one time, this was a view held almost entirely by unbelievers. However recent books by those claiming to be evangelicals have brought this discussion front and center. Those who truly have a desire to reach the unchurched have a burden to see people in the eternity of heaven, but they also desire to see them escape the wrath of an eternal hell. Denying the existence of hell undermines the urgency of placing one’s faith in Christ.

4. Busyness – Perhaps one of Satan’s most effective strategies is to get us so busy that we fail to do that which is such a high biblical priority. We can be deluded into complacency about the lostness of humanity around us. The unchurched are waiting for you to tell them about Jesus. They need to be on your to-do list. What priority do you give to reaching the lost?

5. Fear of Rejection – In research on this subject, I found that only one in four unchurched persons we be resistant to faith discussions. But nearly four out of ten of the unchurched will be receptive to your concern for their eternity, and more than one out three will simply be neutral to your attempts. Simply stated, fear of rejection is unfounded. The few with an antagonistic attitude are not rejecting your personally; their anger is merely a reflection of something in their past. Fear of rejection is an often-used excuse by Christians for their failure to witness. And it is just that: an excuse.

6. A Desire to Be Tolerant – The message of the gospel, in some senses, is intolerant. The one true God insists there can be no other gods. He is a jealous God and leaves no room for other gods. In the post-modern culture of 21st century America, Christians should know the criticisms of intolerance will come. The great concern is that many Christians are unwilling to take a narrow view because they do not want to be labeled as intolerant. But Jesus never waivered in His insistence that He is the only way to the one and only true God.

7. Losing the Habit of Witnessing – Some Christians have been very active in sharing their faith with the lost and the unchurched. But, for a myriad of reasons, they get out of the habit, and it no longer becomes a priority. Witnessing, like prayer and Bible study, is a discipine. It is a habit to learn, to retain, and, if lost, to regain.

8. Lack of Accountability – Programmatic evangelism in local churches is sometimes denigrated because it is seen as a “canned” approach to witnessing. But one of the strengths of many of these programs is that some inherent system of accoutnability is built into the program itself. Accountability is likely to engender more witnessing attempts to the unchurched. Attempting more evangelistic encounters creates a habit of witnessing that then increases our zeal for evangelism.

9. Failure to Invite – When is the last time you invited an unchurched person to church? When is the last time you offered to take a person to church, or, at the very least, meet him or her at church? It’s a simple gesture, yet so few Christians do it.

10. We Go to Churches That Do Not Reach the Unchurched – We only reach one person for Christ each year for every 85 church members in the United States. That is a frightening and terrible ratio. One of the key reasons we do not reach the unchurched is that most Christians in America are members of churches that do not reach the unchurched.

I think he pretty much nails it on items 2,3 and 6.  The main problem as I see it is:

  1. Failure to preach the gospel – we have taken the gospel out of our pulpits (where did the pulpit go? it’s just an empty stage now) and replaced it with devotional homilies that help us get along better.
  2. Too many false converts – a true Christian will share his faith and knows what he was saved from and saved to – the false converts fill the pews (or stadium seating) and go live like the world the other six days of the week.
  3. The concept of sin is missing – pastors don’t preach on sin because it might offend a visitor.  In fact, everything about the church has been tailored to visitors or “unchurched” and thus the sheep haven’t been fed in so long they can barely stand any more.
  4. The gospel is assumed but never taught – many invitations assume that people know what to do to get right with the Lord but it is never clearly presented in the sermon or the invitation.
  5. You can’t share what you don’t know – those who are unfortunate enough to have been saved only in the last twenty years have probably never heard a rousing sermon on salvation that included the fall of man, his sinfulness, his need of a Savior and exactly what steps are needed to be saved.

Romans 10:13-14 ESV
(13)  For “everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.”
(14)  How then will they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone preaching?

If the pastors won’t preach the gospel, don’t blame the church members for not sharing it.

Advertisements

The TBN War

From the Christian Post:

By Audrey Barrick, Christian Post Reporter

July 1, 2012|4:53 pm

Trinity Christian Center of Santa Ana (which conducts business as TBN) is petitioning the court against former employees Michael and Brittany Koper for failing to settle their dispute outside of court.

The Kopers, according to the court filing by TBN attorney Douglas L. Mahaffey, have failed to file any timely response to their demand for arbitration. TBN claims that the Kopers are refusing to arbitrate because they believe “their hush money agenda was advanced by the public forums.”

“The reasons for the Kopers not participating have been strategic,” according to the petition. “Since their termination, the Kopers have pursued ‘hush money’ by a media campaign to undermine the mission and reputation of TCCSA by making baseless allegations against TCCSA’s principals.

“Taking advantage of their access to financial and employment files, the Kopers absconded with large quantities of TCCSA corporate records, and now are systematically disclosing to the news media and other information-based organizations confidential information and trade secrets.”

Brittany Koper is the granddaughter of TBN founders Paul and Jan Crouch. She previously served as the chief financial officer, director of finance, corporate treasurer and director of human resources while Michael Koper worked with TCCSA’s general counsel.

The former CFO filed a lawsuit earlier this year, claiming that the board of directors at the Christian company illegally took advantage of more than $50 million in “charitable assets” for their own good. The lawsuit wasn’t against TBN, however. It was against attorneys of Davert & Loe who do some work for TBN. Koper claimed that the attorneys advised her to falsify public financial disclosures and government records after she discovered illegal financial practices taking place

The Orange County, Calif.-based TBN has made its own allegations against the Kopers. The broadcasting company, which has over 5,000 television stations, alleges that the couple made “illegal use of the corporation credit card of the president of TCCSA,” embezzled funds, and stole and converted to their own use property and assets of TCCSA.

In the latest court filing, TBN argues that the Kopers had entered into a written comprehensive arbitration agreement during their employment and have breached the terms of the agreement.

All disputes were to be settled outside of court.

“All efforts by TCCSA to move forward with arbitration and terminate the disclosure of internal records have been stonewalled by the Kopers who refuse to move toward a resolution of the disputes between the parties,”the court document states.

TBN is seeking a court order stating that the Kopers are in default, and enjoining any filings by the couple of counterclaims.

Here’s how to read this news story between the lines.  TBN hires all family for key positions to keep a centralized power base thinking family will be loyal and keep secrets. 

The gospel that TBN claims to preach actually reached out and transformed one family member making her an ethical and responsible Christian.

This lone Christian tries to do the right thing and get the books legal.  Grandma Jan pitches a fit.  Uncle Matt was caught with his hands in the cookie jar.  Granddaughter must be fired!

Now the TBN lawyers want to keep granddaughter from disclosing any more wrongdoings at the old TBN corral so they are filing motions to keep their “trade secrets.”

If I were on the jury, I would want to know just exactly what kind of “trade secrets” does a Christian organization have?  This is way better than a soap opera don’t you think?